A Professional Employment Screening Can Help with Compliance

Every company desires to be compliant in their hiring and employment practices.  In the ever changing world of employment law, it is important for every small, medium or large company to have an understanding of everything that goes into creating HR Policies that will be 100% compliant with EEOC and Federal and State guidelines. 

First and foremost, be aware of state and federal laws.  The background check industry has come under scrutiny in the last several years due to companies returning information that violated the FCRA and EEOC.  When conducting an employment screening, make sure your HR staff is knowledgeable about employment law.  In California, for example, last year saw the creation of limitations on the use of credit reports in hiring decisions.  Also, several states have worked to “ban the box,” making it more challenging to utilize past criminal history in a hiring decision unless it falls within the parameters of what is required to be successful at the position being applied for.  An employment screening is a valuable tool, and if used according to state and federal laws, it can be a make or break part of the hiring process.

It’s also important to make sure people receiving promotions are re-screened, or in some cases have an employment screening conducted on them for the first time.  The purpose of a re-screen is that things can happen to an individual that might directly impact their ability to take on greater responsibility within the company.  Often times, this type of employment screening might delve deeper into an employee’s background.  It is important to remember that even when re-screening a current employee, the same federal and state rules apply, should it come to utilizing information discovered for adverse action.

A company like PeopleG2 helps its clients remain compliant amidst all of the continual change that happens at every level of a regulatory agency or government.  Employment screening is an important part of a hiring decision, but it can be a trap that companies can easily find themselves falling into as they fall prey to litigation from people that are looking for even the slightest misstep in a hiring process.